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  • Geek City: Changing How To Change Your Database Properties — ALTER DATABASE

    (This article was originally published at https://www.dbbest.com/blog/ ) Long ago (in SQL Server years) many metadata changes were implemented with special one-off stored procedures. For example, we had sp_addindex and sp_dropindex, as well as sp_addtype, sp_droptype, sp_addlogin and sp_droplogin. For changing certain database properties, we ...
    Posted to Kalen Delaney (Weblog) by Kalen Delaney on September 20, 2017
  • 24 Hours of PASS – Locking and Blocking Q&A

    Thanks to everyone who attended my 24HOP session on Wednesday, September 7. My favorite part is always the Q&A. I wish there was more time to do live Q&A, but because there’s not, I get to turn it into a blog post! My session was a snippet of what I will be talking about in my pre-con for the big PASS Summit at the end of next month. ...
    Posted to Kalen Delaney (Weblog) by Kalen Delaney on September 13, 2016
  • Geek City: Creating New Tools for Statistics

      I was just starting to work on a post on column statistics, using one of my favorite metadata functions: sys.dm_db_stats_properties(), when I realized something was missing. The function requires a stats_id value, which is available from sys.stats. However, sys.stats does not show the column names that each statistics object is attached ...
    Posted to Kalen Delaney (Weblog) by Kalen Delaney on January 27, 2015
  • Geek City: How old are my statistics?

    This post is basically to answer a question asked in class this week: How can we get the last statistics update date for ALL user tables in a database? After working on the query for a while, I realized that the new metadata function I posted about here can give you that info easily: SELECT object_name(sp.object_id) as object_name,name as ...
    Posted to Kalen Delaney (Weblog) by Kalen Delaney on August 31, 2013
  • Geek City: sp_cacheobjects for SQL Server 2012

    In a post about 4 1/2 years ago, I gave you my version of a replacement for the old pre-2005 pseudotable syscacheobjects. I called it sp_cacheobjects and created it as a view in the master database. With the sp_ prefix, the view can be accessed from any database. When testing this on SQL Server 2012, I noticed that I almost always got a lot more ...
    Posted to Kalen Delaney (Weblog) by Kalen Delaney on July 31, 2013
  • Did You Know? Turning Off Locking

    Back when the lock manager was rewritten for SQL Server 7, and row level locking was added to the product, the procedure sp_indexoption gave us the ability to turn OFF either row or page locks or both, for one particular index, or for a table and all the indexes on it. I must admit, I rarely found this option to be the solution to any sticky ...
    Posted to Kalen Delaney (Weblog) by Kalen Delaney on May 7, 2012
  • Geek City: Plan Caching Internals

    This Friday is the last of my summer seminars. On August 27, I am presenting on plan caching, plan reuse and recompile and plan cache metadata. This is one of my favorite topics to talk about, because a lot of the information is not very widely known, and you can have a tremendous performance impact by making sure when plans are reused when that ...
    Posted to Kalen Delaney (Weblog) by Kalen Delaney on August 23, 2010
  • Geek City: My Big Fat Partitioning Query

    When SQL Server first introduced table and index partitioning in SQL 2005, it was the same version that all the metadata changed. So I decided that I could learn a lot about metadata and a lot about the organization and storage of partitions if I tried to write a query, and then a view, that included almost everything anyone would ever need to ...
    Posted to Kalen Delaney (Weblog) by Kalen Delaney on July 26, 2010
  • Geek City: Exploring the Transaction Log Structure

    As I mentioned last October, my PASS preconference seminar was a whole day about the transaction log. I told the attendees all kinds of things about the structure of the log, and told them about one of the best tools for exploring the structure: the command DBCC LOGINFO. This command is officially undocumented, but numerous bloggers have discussed ...
    Posted to Kalen Delaney (Weblog) by Kalen Delaney on December 21, 2009
  • Geek City: How Many Rows?

    In my last post, I told you I'd post something technical before I left for Sweden. I almost made it. I wrote this in the Seattle airport, but wasn't able to post it until I got to Stockholm. For as long as I've been working with SQL Server, I've been hearing/reading questions about how to quickly get a count of the number of rows in a table. ...
    Posted to Kalen Delaney (Weblog) by Kalen Delaney on December 7, 2009
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